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news archive April 2004

 
   
your information resource in human molecular genetics
 
     
2004-04-27
  • Raising The Dead
    Resurrecting ancient genes is now allowing scientists to peer into the genetic causes of primeval evolutionary processes.
  • Should Healthy People Take Mind-Boosting Drugs?
    Is it safe, fair and morally acceptable to use drugs originally created for mental dysfunctions to improve the minds of normal, healthy people? The time to answer these social and ethical questions is now, says a group of leading neuroscientists.
  • Understanding HIV Drug Resistance
    A study reports two related structures of reverse transcriptase (RT) with bound tenofovir. The results explain the unusually low resistance of HIV to tenofovir.
  • Harnessing The Activity Of A Detox Enzyme
    Researchers have determined the structure of an enzyme that inactivates the nerve agent sarin and related toxic molecules.
  • Noticing The Mistakes Of Others
    The same brain region is active both when people make errors and when they watch other people making errors.
  • Tan, Then Transplant
    A dose of ultraviolet (UV) radiation staves off graft vs. host disease (GVHD) after a bone marrow transplant.
  • Suppressing The Bad
    Autoimmunity is normally prevented in most people, possibly because of a population of CD8 suppressor cells, whose existence has now been proven by scientists.
  • A New Mode For Killing Cancer Cells
    The p53 protein performs a more direct role in cell suicide (apoptosis) by interacting with one of the pro-death proteins.
  • HIV/Polio Vaccine Theory Refuted
    The data should help to end speculation that the immunodeficiency virus jumped to humans after polio vaccines became contaminated with a simian form of the virus.
  • No Need For Men?
    Researchers have produced live mice by parthenogenesis, in which the unfertilized egg retains two sets of chromosomes and begins to develop as if it had been fertilized.
2004-04-20 2004-04-13

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