home   genetic news   bioinformatics   biotechnology   literature   journals   ethics   positions   events   sitemap
 
  HUM-MOLGEN -> Genetic News | search  
 

Should Healthy People Take Mind-Boosting Drugs?

 
  April, 27 2004 9:50
your information resource in human molecular genetics
 
     
Is it safe, fair and morally acceptable to use drugs originally created for mental dysfunctions to improve the minds of normal, healthy people?

The time to answer these social and ethical questions is now, says a group of leading neuroscientists in Nature Reviews Neuroscience. For example, will employers preferentially hire candidates because they are taking mind-boosting treatments? Will people be coerced into enhancing their minds through drugs? Are these treatments safe in the long term or is there a danger of mental decline in old age? How different are these from other self-improvement therapies, such as cosmetic surgery?

Prescription stimulants such as Ritalin are already being used by high school and college students eager to get better grades, and nutritional supplements that promise improved memory are widely available. So, discussion of how society can address these issues is urgently needed.

Contact:

Martha Farah
University of Pennsylvania, USA
Tel: +1 215 573 3531
E-mail: mfarah@psych.upenn.edu

Judy Illes
Stanford University, USA
Tel: +1 650 724 6393
E-mail: illes@stanford.edu

(C) Nature Reviews Neuroscience press release.


Message posted by: Trevor M. D'Souza

print this article mail this article
Bookmark and Share this page (what is this?)

Social bookmarking allows users to save and categorise a personal collection of bookmarks and share them with others. This is different to using your own browser bookmarks which are available using the menus within your web browser.

Use the links below to share this article on the social bookmarking site of your choice.

Read more about social bookmarking at Wikipedia - Social Bookmarking

Latest News
Variants Associated with Pediatric Allergic Disorder

Mutations in PHF6 Found in T-Cell Leukemia

Genetic Risk Variant for Urinary Bladder Cancer

Antibody Has Therapeutic Effect on Mice with ALS

Regulating P53 Activity in Cancer Cells

Anti-RNA Therapy Counters Breast Cancer Spread

Mitochondrial DNA Diversity

The Power of RNA Sequencing

‘Pro-Ageing' Therapy for Cancer?

Niche Genetics Influence Leukaemia

Molecular Biology: Clinical Promise for RNA Interference

Chemoprevention Cocktail for Colon Cancer

more news ...

Generated by News Editor 2.0 by Kai Garlipp
WWW: Kai Garlipp, Frank S. Zollmann.
7.0 © 1995-2016 HUM-MOLGEN. All rights reserved. Liability, Copyright and Imprint.