home   genetic news   bioinformatics   biotechnology   literature   journals   ethics   positions   events   sitemap
 
  HUM-MOLGEN -> Genetic News | search  
 

Knowledge and Attitudes Towards Genetic Testing: A Two Year Follow-Up Study in Patients with Asthma, Diabetes Mellitus and Cardiovascular Disease

 
  September, 19 2007 20:45
your information resource in human molecular genetics
 
     
Knowledge and Attitudes Towards Genetic Testing: A Two Year Follow-Up Study in Patients with Asthma, Diabetes Mellitus and Cardiovascular Disease

Authors:

Hiske Calsbeek, NIVEL, Netherlands Institute for Health Services Research, Utrecht, The Netherlands, and NIVEL, PO Box 1568, BN Utrecht, 3500, The Netherlands. Mattijn Morren, Jozien Bensing and Mieke Rijken, NIVEL, PO Box 1568, BN Utrecht, 3500, The Netherlands.

Published in Journal of Genetic Counseling (Vol. 16, No. 4, pp. 493-504, August 2007).

Abstract: Adequate knowledge and personal attitudes towards DNA-testing are major determinants of optimal utilization of genetic testing. This study aims to (1) assess the genetic knowledge and attitude towards genetic testing of patients with asthma, diabetes mellitus type II and cardiovascular diseases, (2) determine whether their knowledge or attitude changed since 2002, and (3) investigate the predictive role of knowledge on attitude. Data were collected within the Panel of Patients with Chronic Diseases in 2002 and 2004, resulting in 398 data-pairs. Results show that factual knowledge mainly relates to associations between genes and diseases, less is known on associations between genes, chromosomes, cells and body. The perceived knowledge on DNA-testing has not increased since 2002. The attitude towards genetic testing also appeared to be rather consistent. Less perceived medical genetic knowledge and more perceived social genetic knowledge were found predictive for a more reserved attitude towards genetic testing. In conclusion, advanced developments in the field of genetics are not accompanied by increased knowledge of patients with common multi-factorial diseases. The finding that more perceived social genetic knowledge results in more reluctance can be considered an indicator for the necessity of social debates on genetic testing.

Author contact:

Hiske Calsbeek Email: h.calsbeek@nivel.nl Article available online.

 (C) Journal of Genetic Counseling.

 

 


Message posted by: Tressie Dalaya

print this article mail this article
Bookmark and Share this page (what is this?)

Social bookmarking allows users to save and categorise a personal collection of bookmarks and share them with others. This is different to using your own browser bookmarks which are available using the menus within your web browser.

Use the links below to share this article on the social bookmarking site of your choice.

Read more about social bookmarking at Wikipedia - Social Bookmarking

Latest News
Variants Associated with Pediatric Allergic Disorder

Mutations in PHF6 Found in T-Cell Leukemia

Genetic Risk Variant for Urinary Bladder Cancer

Antibody Has Therapeutic Effect on Mice with ALS

Regulating P53 Activity in Cancer Cells

Anti-RNA Therapy Counters Breast Cancer Spread

Mitochondrial DNA Diversity

The Power of RNA Sequencing

‘Pro-Ageing' Therapy for Cancer?

Niche Genetics Influence Leukaemia

Molecular Biology: Clinical Promise for RNA Interference

Chemoprevention Cocktail for Colon Cancer

more news ...

Generated by News Editor 2.0 by Kai Garlipp
WWW: Kai Garlipp, Frank S. Zollmann.
7.0 © 1995-2017 HUM-MOLGEN. All rights reserved. Liability, Copyright and Imprint.