home   genetic news   bioinformatics   biotechnology   literature   journals   ethics   positions   events   sitemap
 
  HUM-MOLGEN -> Genetic News | search  
 

Studies Expand Understanding of X Chromosome

 
  March, 18 2005 20:24
your information resource in human molecular genetics
 
     
The National Institutes of Health (NIH) hailed the first comprehensive analysis of the sequence of the human X chromosome, saying that this provides sweeping new insights into the evolution of sex chromosomes and the biological differences between males and females. These studies, a detailed analysis of the X chromosome’s DNA sequence and a survey of its gene activity, are published in the current issue of the journal Nature.

"These detailed analyses of the X chromosome represent a monumental achievement for biology and medicine. They are exciting examples of what is being learned from the vast trove of sequence data produced by the Human Genome Project and made freely available to researchers around the world," said Francis S. Collins, M.D., Ph.D., director of National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), part of NIH, which led the U.S. component of the Human Genome Project along with the Department of Energy.

The sequencing work on the X chromosome was carried out as part of the Human Genome Project at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute in Hinxton, England; Baylor College of Medicine, Houston; Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis; the Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics, Berlin; the Institute of Molecular Biotechnology, Jena, Germany; and Applied Biosystems, Inc., Foster City, CA.

In October 2004, the International Human Genome Sequencing Consortium published its scientific description of the finished human genome sequence in Nature. Detailed annotations and analyses have already been published for chromosomes 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 13, 14, 19, 20, 21, 22 and Y. Publications describing the remaining chromosomes are forthcoming. The sequence of the X chromosome, as well as the rest of the human genome sequence, can be accessed through the following public databases: GenBank at NIH's National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI); the UCSC Genome Browser at the University of California at Santa Cruz; the Ensembl Genome Browser at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and the EMBL-European Bioinformatics Institute; the DNA Data Bank of Japan; and EMBL-Bank at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory's Nucleotide Sequence Database.

For complete article go to NIH News.


Message posted by: Rashmi Nemade

print this article mail this article
Bookmark and Share this page (what is this?)

Social bookmarking allows users to save and categorise a personal collection of bookmarks and share them with others. This is different to using your own browser bookmarks which are available using the menus within your web browser.

Use the links below to share this article on the social bookmarking site of your choice.

Read more about social bookmarking at Wikipedia - Social Bookmarking

Latest News
Variants Associated with Pediatric Allergic Disorder

Mutations in PHF6 Found in T-Cell Leukemia

Genetic Risk Variant for Urinary Bladder Cancer

Antibody Has Therapeutic Effect on Mice with ALS

Regulating P53 Activity in Cancer Cells

Anti-RNA Therapy Counters Breast Cancer Spread

Mitochondrial DNA Diversity

The Power of RNA Sequencing

‘Pro-Ageing' Therapy for Cancer?

Niche Genetics Influence Leukaemia

Molecular Biology: Clinical Promise for RNA Interference

Chemoprevention Cocktail for Colon Cancer

more news ...

Generated by News Editor 2.0 by Kai Garlipp
WWW: Kai Garlipp, Frank S. Zollmann.
7.0 © 1995-2016 HUM-MOLGEN. All rights reserved. Liability, Copyright and Imprint.