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news archive October 2004

 
   
your information resource in human molecular genetics
 
     
2004-10-26
  • A New Obesity Gene
    Study reports that a severe childhood obesity may be caused by partial loss of a growth factor receptor.
  • Boosting Anti-Tuberculosis Immunity
    A clinical trial shows that a new vaccine against tuberculosis can induce a long-lasting boost of immune responses in people who previously received the widely used vaccine bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG).
  • Transplant Tolerance In Infants
    Study shows that infants can tolerate incompatible heart transplants for years and provides a possible cellular explanation.
  • Inflammatory Injection
    Scientists have discovered how the pathogenic bacteria Helicobacter pylori can cause gastric inflammation in some people.
  • X-Linked Cancer Gene: One Hit Hypothesis
    Study provides an example for a faster route to cancer, involving a mutation in a single copy of a susceptibility gene.
  • Reversible Drug For Thromboses
    Scientists report that an unconventional drug, comprising the nucleic acid RNA, is efficacious in animals as an anticoagulant.
  • Protein Clumps Acquitted In Huntington's Investigation
    Researchers have discovered that the tiny clumps of abnormal protein found in diseased nerve cells actually help to boost the cells' chances of survival.
  • Allergy Molecule Identified
    Researchers have identified a molecule that is involved in mediating allergic reactions.
  • Allergy Molecule Identified
    Researchers have identified a molecule that is involved in mediating allergic reactions.
  • ATM Withdrawal Leads To Bone Marrow Failure
    A gene known to maintain cell-cycle stability by mediating oxidative stress is vital in the continuing production of adult stem cells.
  • Human Genome Refined
    Analysis of the completed sequence of the gene-containing portion of the human genome. Also, another related study cautions that a commonly used genome-sequencing technique may not be as accurate as was thought.
2004-10-12 2004-10-10

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